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Objectives (Grades 2-3)

  • Number and Number Sense
    • 2.1 The student will
      • a) read, write, and identify the place value of each digit in a three-digit numeral, using numeration models; and
      • b) round two-digit numbers to the nearest ten.
    • 2.2 The student will compare two whole numbers between 0 and 999, using symbols (>, <, or =) and words (greater than, less than, or equal to).
    • 2.3 The student will identify the ordinal positions first through twentieth, using an ordered set of objects.
    • 2.4 The student will identify the part of a set and/or region that represents fractions for one-half, one-third, one-fourth, one-eighth, and one-tenth and write the corresponding fraction.
    • 2.5 The student will
      • a) count forward by twos, fives, and tens to 100, starting at various multiples of 2, 5, or 10, using mental mathematics, paper and pencil, hundred chart, calculators, and/or concrete objects, as appropriate;
      • b) count backward by tens from 100;
      • c) group objects by threes and fours; and
      • d) recognize even and odd numbers, using objects.
    • 3.1 The student will read and write six-digit numerals and identify the place value for each digit.
    • 3.2 The student will round a whole number, 9,999 or less, to the nearest ten, hundred, and thousand.
    • 3.3 The student will compare two whole numbers between 0 and 9,999, using symbols (>, <, or = ) and words (greater than, less than, or equal to).
    • 3.4 The student will recognize and use the inverse relationships between addition/subtraction and multiplication/division to complete basic fact sentences. Students will use these relationships to solve problems such as 5 + 3 = 8 and 8 - 3 = ____.
    • 3.5 The student will
      • a) divide regions and sets to represent a fraction; and
      • b) name and write the fractions represented by a given model (area/region, length/measurement, and set). Fractions (including mixed numbers) will include halves, thirds, fourths, eighths, and tenths.
    • 3.6 The student will compare the numerical value of two fractions having like and unlike denominators, using concrete or pictorial models involving areas/regions, lengths/measurements, and sets.
    • 3.7 The student will read and write decimals expressed as tenths and hundredths, using concrete materials and models.
  • Computation and Estimation
    • 2.6 The student will recall basic addition facts - i.e., sums to 18 or less - and the corresponding subtraction facts.
    • 2.7 The student, given two whole numbers whose sum is 99 or less, will
      • a) estimate the sum; and
      • b) find the sum, using various methods of calculation (mental computation, concrete materials, and paper and pencil).
    • 2.8 The student, given two whole numbers, each of which is 99 or less, will
      • a) estimate the difference; and
      • b) find the difference, using various methods of calculation (mental computation, concrete materials, and paper and pencil).
    • 2.9 The student will create and solve one-step addition and subtraction problems using data from simple tables, picture graphs, bar graphs, and practical situations.
    • 2.10 The student, given a simple addition or subtraction fact, will recognize and describe the related facts which represent and describe the inverse relationship between addition and subtraction (e.g., 3 + __ = 7, ___ + 3 = 7; 7 - 3 = __, and 7 - __ = 3).
    • 3.8 The student will solve problems involving the sum or difference of two whole numbers, each 9,999 or less, with or without regrouping, using various computational methods, including calculators, paper and pencil, mental computation, and estimation.
    • 3.9 The student will recall the multiplication and division facts through the nines table.
    • 3.10 The student will represent multiplication and division, using area and set models, and create and solve problems that involve multiplication of two whole numbers, one factor 99 or less and the second factor 5 or less.
    • 3.11 The student will add and subtract with proper fractions having like denominators of 10 or less, using concrete materials and pictorial models representing areas/regions, lengths/measurements, and sets.
    • 3.12 The student will add and subtract with decimals expressed as tenths, using concrete materials, pictorial representations, and paper and pencil.
  • Measurement
    • 2.11 The student will
      • a) count and compare a collection of pennies, nickels, dimes, and quarters whose total value is $2.00 or less; and
      • b) identify the correct usage of the cent symbol (), dollar symbol ($), and decimal point (.).
    • 2.12 The student will estimate and then use a ruler to make linear measurements to the nearest centimeter and inch, including measuring the distance around a polygon in order to determine perimeter.
    • 2.13 The student, given grid paper, will estimate and then count the number of square units needed to cover a given surface in order to determine area.
    • 2.14 The student will estimate and then count the number of cubes in a rectangular box in order to determine volume.
    • 2.15 The student will estimate and then determine weight/mass of familiar objects in pounds and/or kilograms, using a scale.
    • 2.16 The student will tell and write time to the quarter hour, using analog and digital clocks.
    • 2.17 The student will use actual measuring devices to compare metric and U.S. Customary units (cups, pints, quarts, gallons, and liters) for measuring liquid volume, using the concepts of more, less, and equivalent.
    • 2.18 The student will
      • a) use calendar language appropriately (e.g., months, today, yesterday, next week, last week);
      • b) determine past and future days of the week; and
      • c) identify specific dates on a given calendar.
    • 2.19 The student will read the temperature on a Celsius and/or Fahrenheit thermometer to the nearest 10 degrees.
    • 3.13 The student will determine by counting the value of a collection of bills and coins whose total value is $5.00 or less, compare the value of the coins or bills, and make change.
    • 3.14 The student will estimate and then use actual measuring devices with metric and U.S. Customary units to measure
      • a) length - inches, feet, yards, centimeters, and meters;
      • b) liquid volume - cups, pints, quarts, gallons, and liters; and
      • c) weight/mass - ounces, pounds, grams, and kilograms.
    • 3.15 The student will tell time to the nearest five-minute interval and to the nearest minute, using analog and digital clocks.
    • 3.16 The student will identify equivalent periods of time, including relationships among days, months, and years, as well as minutes and hours.
    • 3.17 The student will read temperature to the nearest degree from a Celsius thermometer and a Fahrenheit thermometer. Real thermometers and physical models of thermometers will be used.
  • Geometry
    • 2.20 The student will identify, describe, and sort three-dimensional (solid) concrete figures, including a cube, rectangular solid (prism), square pyramid, sphere, cylinder, and cone, according to the number and shape of the solid's faces, edges, and corners.
    • 2.21 The student will identify and create figures, symmetric along a line, using various concrete materials.
    • 2.22 The student will compare and contrast plane and solid geometric shapes (circle/sphere, square/cube, and rectangle/rectangular solid).
    • 3.18 The student will analyze two-dimensional (plane) and three-dimensional (solid) geometric figures (circle, square, rectangle, triangle, cube, rectangular solid [prism], square pyramid, sphere, cone, and cylinder) and identify relevant properties, including the number of corners, square corners, edges, and the number and shape of faces, using concrete models.
    • 3.19 The student will identify and draw representations of line segments and angles, using a ruler or straightedge.
    • 3.20 The student, given appropriate drawings or models, will identify and describe congruent and symmetrical, two-dimensional (plane) figures, using tracing procedures.
  • Probability and Statistics
    • 2.23 The student will read, construct, and interpret a simple picture and bar graph.
    • 2.24 The student will record data from experiments, using spinners and colored tiles/cubes, and use the data to predict which of two events is more likely to occur if the experiment is repeated.
    • 3.21 The student, given grid paper, will
      • a) collect and organize data on a given topic of his/her choice, using observations, measurements, surveys, or experiments; and
      • b) construct a line plot, a picture graph, or a bar graph to represent the results. Each graph will include an appropriate title and key.
    • 3.22 The student will read and interpret data represented in line plots, bar graphs, and picture graphs and write a sentence analyzing the data.
    • 3.23 The student will investigate and describe the concept of probability as chance and list possible results of a given situation.
  • Patterns, Functions, and Algebra
    • 2.25 The student will identify, create, and extend a wide variety of patterns, using numbers concrete objects and pictures.
    • 2.26 The student will solve problems by completing a numerical sentence involving the basic facts for addition and subtraction. Examples include: 3 + __ = 7, or 9 - __ = 2. Students will create story problems, using the numerical sentences.
    • 3.24 The student will recognize and describe a variety of patterns formed using concrete objects, numbers, tables, and pictures, and extend the pattern, using the same or different forms (concrete objects, numbers, tables, and pictures).
    • 3.25 The student will
      • a) investigate and create patterns involving numbers, operations (addition and multiplication), and relations that model the identity and commutative properties for addition and multiplication; and
      • b) demonstrate an understanding of equality by recognizing that the equal sign (=) links equivalent quantities, such as 4 o 3 = 2 o 6.

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